a story of Southern agriculture

FarrrTHUR 2 – Women in Agriculture Roles

 

 

The roles of women in agriculture are changing.  We’ve always been important.  What stands to be acknowledged today is how we are evolving with the modern challenges in agriculture.

 

– we are taking over our fathers’ farms

– we are widows owning farms across the nation as we outlive our good farming men

– we are nurturers who have a 6th sense for land and business, family and farm

– we’re the new farmers on the block, and we’re finding that even if we grew up in the city, we’re really good at this farming thing

 

 

“From a global perspective, women-run farms dedicated to growing food are far from unusual. Women grow 60% to 80% of developing countries’ food supply and are responsible for half of the world’s food production, according to Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates.”                      ~Katie Micik

 

 

Katie Micik writes for The Progressive Farmer magazine/website and recently I enjoyed sitting down for a few minutes with her series about The Changing Face of Ag Women.  I thought you might enjoy it, too.

Part 1 – Women take more active production role on farm

Part2 –  Women landowners share experiences, Learn from others

Part 3 – More women aspire to start small farms.

 

 

swag-1

Circa 1953 – Southern Farm Life ~ Pictured here after Sunday church services my mother-in-law and her “Granddaddy Brown” pose with a set of twin calves. It was a big deal for his small farm to have a set of twins. ~ Carolyn grew up to be a school teacher and moved to the Midwest. She managed her family property from several states away. Indeed, she and my father-in-law, Steve, managed to keep Granddaddy Brown’s and her own folk’s farm for their son, my Farmer. ~ Women in agriculture preserve more than sanity. They work with the good Earth and lawyers, family photos and livestock, Providence and estate planners.

 

 

Here’s to us, ladies…

 

with our tractors and hand trowels,

 

our fields and patio pots,

 

our purses and 80% of household purchase choices –

 

…we feed the world and our little world.

 

I’m so thankful for each of you and your role in agriculture – our roles as nurturers and bread winners are crucial to those who sit at our little table and at any table, be it local or international – your role in agriculture production and consumption is part of a vast industry that strives to nourish people and countries.

May you truly see how you are clothed with strength and dignity for this seemingly mundane yet altogether vital role.

And may you feel the fellowship of generations who have fed their families and their communities – the oldest job in the world!

 

Best
Emily Grace

 

For more FarrrTHUR

 

 

41 Responses to “FarrrTHUR 2 – Women in Agriculture Roles”

  1. Myla

    I love being a woman involved in agriculture! It’s a wonderful community and I’m thankful to be a part of it. Beautifully written!

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  2. countrylinked

    I will be reading the series that you talked about! Women play so many different rolls in Agriculture and feeding the world, that we sometimes forget to pay tribute to them. A great post E.G. and one that I will be sharing will all of my fellow FarmHer’s!

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    • Emily Grace

      Thanks, Laurie!

      I get Google+ emails from you all the time. I need to figure that out. Social media – I’ll eventually get there. 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

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  3. Debbie S.

    Emily Grace, I’ve just been catching up on your blog, and it’s been really interesting learning about the cattle and life as a Farmer’s wife. What a great way to keep a record of your journey!

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    • Emily Grace

      Thank you for stopping by and saying hi, Debbie! Hope you are having a good week! If you have leftover brisket, I know it’s a very good week. 😉

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    • Emily Grace

      Sheri, I’m just plain honored that you wanted to reblog this post. Women in agriculture is a very important topic. Thank you for promoting it.

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      • sheridegrom - From the literary and legislative trenches.

        My pleasure. I’ve seen some nice comments on my blog about women in agriculture. It’s an important topic and one that must stay at the front in today’s sociological changes. Another topic in agriculture I’m gravely concerned about is the average age of most farmers. The last time I saw the numbers, it was something close to 75% were over the age of 65%. My father was on the ranch until his late 80’s and on horseback counting cows and all you have to do to keep a ranch profitable. Your blog is important. I may not get to you as quickly as I’d like, but trust me, I’ll be there.

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      • Emily Grace

        Thanks, Sheri. I’m glad you’re here.:)

        You’re right about the average age of farmers. I don’t know how to change it quickly, but I do know that those who want to take over the family farm or pass it along do have options. There are wonderful resources available for leaving this legacy and carrying this important job case by case. I need to post on that soon!

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      • sheridegrom - From the literary and legislative trenches.

        Yes indeed. I’d love to know more. I hear almost weekly about farms being auctioned off because the younger generation simply cannot make a go of it on the farm. They want to stay and have worked along with their fathers and often their grandfathers. But, expenses are up, nothing you don’t already know. Many of the farms are in debt. I so want to see family farming continue.

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  4. FlaHam

    Emily, I came to via a reblog by Sheridegrom, and this is such an interesting read. I claim to be from Kentucky and all the farmers I ever encountered were men, but in south central Kentucky the best vegetable gardens with the best veggies, all came from the labors of the Farmers wife. I never made the correlations between the two until reading this piece. Take care, Bill

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    • Emily Grace

      Hi Bill,

      Thanks for sharing your memories. It pleases me to “connect the dots” with your memories and present realities of women in agriculture. That just makes my week.

      Thanks for stopping by!
      Best,
      Emily Grace

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  5. thefarmpaparazzi

    EG, this was beautifully written! Loved your reference to Proverbs 31 and your comment about feeding the world and our little world. You rock my socks! -Liz

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