a story of Southern agriculture

a Tom Gray PSA – tornado season

We’re not storm chasers around here.

Livestock thrown into trees is a nightmare.  Sometimes, they’re still alive up there in the trees and we have to deal with that – with knowing they won’t come down out of the trees alive – with getting all of them down – with burying them – with swallowing hard and being thankful on “takes away” days on the pasture.

My apologies if that was a hard paragraph to stomach, but I think you should know that given our daily acceptance of the weather and dependence on many, many heartbeats…

We especially don’t want to hear about us or any of you in the newswe value your well-being.  Our personal and professional lives ultimately center around valuing human life and growth. 

Sooooo,

 

tom psa 2

Ready.gov for Tornado Season

 

Ready for the basement,
BoB, Buddy, Tom

 

but not my Farmer…because he has formidable courage and a strong sense of community service, he shows up to first respond if needed.  Some day I’ll post for you on how farmers add community service to their load – it’s amazing how they give back and how they’re known for this generosity and participation as a species

But that’s a post for another day because I’m in charge of the “Lord have mercies” department and I’ve got to log off and get to it.  You take Tom’s advice and hunker down. 

Much love – and a tractor and a skid steer and a strong shoulder and a chain saw if you need it come morning.  ~eg

 

21 Responses to “a Tom Gray PSA – tornado season”

  1. SJ

    I love the Tom memes! Very vivid descriptions, but to be honest I had a flash to the Wizard of Oz when she sees a cow in the twister…

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    • Emily Grace

      Tom loves to star in memes!

      I hadn’t thought of that Oz scene…thanks for reminding me of that. Lots of people will get what I’m talking about, I guess!

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  2. Franco Guerri

    Reading Job this morning, came across “the Lord gives, and the Lord takes away”. The why is the only question He won’t entertain.
    Here in California, many livestock producers have had to give up a large part of their breeding stock they have been selecting over the years because of the drought. Groves of mature fruit and nut trees are also without water and dying.
    “God willin’ and the Creek Don’t rise” , a song my wife and I wrote on a road trip once. Great phrase that says it all.

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    • Emily Grace

      Hi Franco,
      We had a difficult time of drought here in the South 2006-2007 – even into 2008 and 2009. That was my first drought as a farmer, and I hope my last. I feel for the California farmers.
      Best,
      eg

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  3. sheridegrom - From the literary and legislative trenches.

    I love reading your blog. Your writing and the wonderful stories you tell take me back to the Flint Hills of Kansas where I grew up on an Angus ranch.
    I grew up knowing what it was like seeing tractors and other farm implements fly through the air. I also witnessed my father pull 23 cows from the creek where a tornado had thrown them. But I also know the sense of community of which you speak. My career has taken me to 35 countries but I’ve never seen the depth of friendship in any other career choice.

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    • Emily Grace

      Oh, Kansas Flint Hills – I have art from a photographer – John D. Morrison http://www.prairievistas.com/ – in my home. I can just see the Flint Hills welcome sign on the interstate and the cattle loading exits – and snowed on and burned and lush green prairie. Good memories – I need another road trip – but your memories prompting mine is quite satisfying. Thanks. 🙂

      The people in agriculture are unlike any others for many reasons – and the depth of friendship as you put it is one of our best distinctions – I’m glad you know it inside and out. Thank you for commenting and sharing your connection to ag!

      Best,
      Emily Grace

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    • Emily Grace

      Hi Anne,
      I have no experience with ditches, but I’d say the general sense of sad and sickening and “how do I fix this if it can be fixed” translates.

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  4. d. tafakari

    Be safe. Where I’m from, a hurricane is more likely to come roaring around the corner than a tornado. But I have great respect for howl wind AND rainstorms alike; either way, destructive weather is a dangerous pain.

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  5. Coloring inside the lines again

    Kind of glued to the tube with the weather in the southeast, have relatives (with livestock) in northwest Tennessee-praying for you-critters and all. We have an abundance of wind today, we’ll be re-shingling again. I guess that’s spring for you, still uncomfortable to say the least.

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    • Emily Grace

      Thank you for your prayers. All turned out well here.

      You’re right – spring, as lovely as it is, can also be so uncomfortable and even devastating. I read a book by Richard Blackaby called “Seasons of God” – actually my farmwife friend, Katie, gave it to me. It parallels the four seasons -their glories, their hazards and their transitions- to our lives. I learned a lot – and one major highlight for me was how some people have a lovely springtime in their life – their beginnings are not so painful. But others, their springtime is crashed by various tornadoes and storms…and yet they must bloom where planted anyhow. It was a very good read – inspiring and healing.

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  6. maryangelis

    Farmers and community — something we city people hear (and dream) of. There was a Vermont dairy farmer who heard his dairy farming neighbors say for years “If only we farmers had some lawmaker in the legislature to listen to us.” So he finally said “What if you had me? What if I went and got a law degree and went to the State House myself?” And they said “Ok, and while you’re in school we’ll show up twice very day for the next 4 years and do all your milking.” And they did. And he’s a lawyer now defending them.

    I tried to google up the story, but instead the internet is full of stories of lawyers who quit and became farmers 🙂

    Anyway. What an eye and mind opening account of you and the hard weather. Yes, heartfelt wishes for the safety of you and your husband and your kith & kin and animals and land.

    Blessings,
    Mary

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    • Emily Grace

      This is a delightful account, Mary. Thanks for sharing! And thank you for caring about our welfare. The storms did no damage to speak of, so we are breathing easier until the next round.

      (: eg

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  7. Coloring inside the lines again

    I think the wind has moved on. We were lucky with just shingles on the shed that will need replacing and time to pick up lots of paper. I guess whatever we experience here in the west will come your way eventually, though, sorry about that.

    My sister tells a funny story about finding a great table cloth for her patio table. She got all excited about adding some other things to compliment it, went inside and when she returned it at “flown the coop”. And it wasn’t even a bad wind day.

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    • Emily Grace

      Ha! I love it that you apologize for the West-to-East weather pattern. LOL
      Out on your western plains the just doesn’t have a reason to stop! Your idea of a “bad wind day” would probably make me faint. 🙂

      Note: I love your blog header picture. so peaceful and lovely.

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